Women in Science

Pacific white-sided dolphin dorsal fin photos and breath samples

October 24, 2018

In August, part of our team traveled to the Broughton Archipelago off the coast of northern Vancouver Island to continue our long-term study on Pacific white-sided dolphins.  This study is multi-faceted. We are studying the health of the population by taking dorsal fin photos for statistical analysis, but we are also studying the health of […]

Southern Resident killer whale monitoring on San Juan Island

October 13, 2018

This summer, from mid-July to the end of September, we studied southern resident killer whale behavior under varying levels of boat and ship traffic. (This is an extension of our 2017 field season with OrcaSound). The Port of Vancouver has asked ships to slow down to less than 11 knots as they transit Haro Strait. Reducing […]

Telling stories about wildlife populations, one photograph at a time

July 09, 2017

Guest post from our newest team member, Natalie Mastick “I look at pictures of dolphins all day,” is my most common answer when asked what I do for work.   It’s an over-simplified statement, albeit accurate, and it usually leads to many follow-up questions. The most frequent being “Why?” That’s a fair question. I then proceed […]

Notes from the field: guest post from Laura Bogaard

September 25, 2016

It was another beautiful day in the North Island neighborhood and Team Dolphin was all aboard our trusty research vessel, Wishart. We were cruising up Tribune Channel in search of our study animal, the Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens). The water was a magnificent pale blue—a reflection of the late-summer sky, and an indicator that this channel […]

The dolphin days of summer

August 27, 2016

Our team has arrived in the Broughton Archipelago and we are poised to carry out our dolphin photo-ID, health assessment, and disturbance studies. This year, we are thrilled to have an amazing team Laura Bogaard and Doug Sandilands. Laura, a student from Quest University, is our newest research assistant. Doug Sandilands has been working with […]

It’s a fish-eat-fish world: does noise affect them?

February 17, 2015

We’re so grateful for this week’s special guest post from Inge van der Knaap, a Erasmus Mundus Master’s student in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation. Inge and her assistant, Sofya Reger, recently completed a beautiful experiment on noise and fish in collaboration with Salmon Coast Field Station.  Inge produced a great video introducing people to her study. […]

National Monuments and Marine Protected Areas

March 25, 2013

Today, President Barack Obama designated five new national monuments, including Cattle Point on San Juan Island in Washington state. This is exciting news, not only because Cattle Point is beautiful and has historic  relevance, but because important feeding habitat of one of the most critically endangered marine mammal populations in the US is just off Cattle […]

The world’s biggest dolphin eating the world’s coolest dolphin

June 28, 2012

During a seemingly ordinary fall day with dolphins,  I captured killer whales attacking and eating a dolphin on film.  It inspired me to devote a chapter of my PhD to killer whale predation on dolphins and the incredibly dynamic interaction unfolding between an intelligent, efficient predator and its similarly intelligent prey.  I’m hooked.  There is […]